All New Procreate Brushes are Here

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I’m excited to introduce a brand new set of high-quality, custom-made Procreate lettering brushes as a follow-up to my first!

These brushes will be a great addition to your collection and make lettering a breeze. They are availible on Creative Market and Gumroad, and are designed for new and experienced iPad calligraphers alike!

Procreate Lettering Set 2

  1. ETHEREAL – This brush is super fun and addicting. It fades as you write, creating a cool variance in opacity.
  2. NEWSPRINT – This brush as a subtle gritty texture.
  3. OPAQUE BOLD – Create thick scripts and bold lettering designs.
  4. OPAQUE – This easy-to-use lettering brush is perfect for elegant calligraphy or funky messy lettering.

Hope to see you using these brushes and enjoying them!

Happy New Year! 🙂

 

Learn Calligraphy with My New Practice Guide Series

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I’m excited to announce that I’m beginning a series of lettering practice guides! They will all be availible for purchase on Gumroad and are suitable as printables to practice brush lettering as well as templates to practice iPad calligraphy in Procreate.

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The first guide is Lowercase Modern Calligraphy.

page-examples

The guide includes:

  • 1 Reference page: See the alphabet at a glance.
  • 2 Intro pages: Trace the alphabet once as an introduction to writing each letter.
  • 6 Practice Pages: Practice tracing and writing each letter of the alphabet again and again to become familiar with the letters.
  • 1 Procreate Calligraphy Brush — You get my Lovely brush from the Procreate Lettering Pack.

More lettering guides are on the way.

Stay tuned!

If you don’t already, follow my blog here and my Gumroad shop to be informed about new products. 🙂

iPad Lettering in Procreate: Brushes, Freebies, and More

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iPad lettering has risen to become the latest craze among calligraphy enthusiasts. Apple Pencil’s marvelous pressure sensitivity makes it a powerful choice for calligraphers who want to explore the expanding world of digital art.

I have been joining in on the fun, both in Paper and in Procreate. Paper is my go-to app, with its inviting interface and the tools I’ve gotten to know so well, but Procreate is great for calligraphy because you can customize the perfect brush for whatever you’re making.

Procreate Brushes for iPad Lettering

I just released a brush set with 6 fundamental lettering brushes I curated for Procreate users on Creative Market and Gumroad. These brushes are versatile and easy to use, so they’re great for beginning iPad letterers and experienced calligraphers alike.

Download a Freebie Brush!

I thought I would share a brand new brush as a freebie so you guys could get a taste of what’s in my pack.

Introducing Fader!

meet-fader

Fader is a calligraphy brush with a bit of color falloff, so it creates a cool variation in opacity, a little bit like watercolor does before a fresh dip.

A Look at Fader

If you write quickly, the ink falls off right away. If you take your time writing the letters, the ink will fall off at a slower pace.

To download Fader for free, click the thumbnail below, which will redirect you to my shop on Gumroad. Pick Fader, add it to your cart, and enter the code rol_blog_reader at checkout. 

gum road button

If you need help installing the brushes, check out this tutorial.


Take a Look at the Brush Pack

So, the official brush pack comes with these six main brushes and includes two bonus.

The Core 6

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  • Monoline has no contrast, so it’s easy to create simplistic, bouncy cursive. (All the names written under the Bs here are with this brush — it’s great for a lot of things!)
  • Subtle is a variation of monoline with slightly contrasted strokes.
  • Playful creates rough edges that work for many styles.
  • Lovely is perfect for modern calligraphy with just of ink bleed.
  • Elegant creates thick downstrokes and delicate thin upstrokes to mimic pointed pen calligraphy.
  • Chalky is great for digital chalk art and lettering, but works for just about anything.

The Bonus Brushes

The two bonus brushes are a glitter brush and a confetti brush. The glitter brush is made for sparkly calligraphy, and the confetti brush adds a simple, colorful decoration.


More Calligraphy Brush Reccomendations

That’s it for my brushes (so far!), but you can never have enough brushes, so I thought I’d reccomend a few freebies from around the web.

favorite-freebies

  1. from Alternate Glyph Calligraphy Crayon and Streaker. iPad calligrapher Melissa Cabral makes unique brushes that you won’t see anywhere else. She is offering these two for free, and I love using them.
  2. from MakeMedia Co. Southern Belle.                                      If you’re a lettering aficionado, you’re probably familiar with Callie Hegstrom‘s funny hand-drawn quotes and popular fonts on Creative Market. She recently began exploring iPad calligraphy and has a lot to show for it. Southern Belle is availible for free on her site.
  3. from iPad Lettering Original Calligraphy.                                     Karin of iPad Lettering was a pioneer in the realm of digital calligraphy. She shares lots of helpful Procreate tutorials and her brushes are used widely and set a high standard in the community. Check out her Original Calligraphy brush.

I hope you guys start stocking up on awesome calligraphy brushes and get lettering!

I’ll be posting more tutorials and tips for iPad lettering soon.  🙂

 

Oh Snap! Hand Lettering Process

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Sometimes hand lettering is simple and fast. Other times, it takes many steps to reach a finished, final piece.

1. Initial Sketch

This first step is usually best in pencil. The initial sketch is the time to map out your idea as best you can.

Took usedStaedtler Lead Holder

 

2. Ink

Inking is my personal least favorite step. I am not very good at getting consistent lines and using pen makes me nervous. If I am planning to digitize my design (whether it’s hand lettering or some other illustration), I usually skip this.

Tool usedSakura Pigma Micron

 

3. Digitize!

I personally like to import a photo of my design into Paper by 53 and trace over it. It’s true that I could have done the whole thing in the app, but I usually feel more comfortable creating an initial sketch with real pencil and paper.

Tool usedPaper and Pencil by 53

 

4. Vectorize

I imported the design I made in Paper into Adobe Illustrator and converted it into Vector artwork. Now I can easily overlay it on photos, change the color, etc. These examples were made using photos from Creative Market.


Download the Oh Snap Vector Art

You can download the free artwork here and make something with it yourself!


Hope you enjoyed seeing my hand lettering process! You are invited to follow me on social media to see more art. If you ever have any questions, comments, or suggestions, please talk to me via the contact page.

Twitter Pinterest RSS social_media_round_icons_pink_color_set_256x256_0014_dribbble 53-icon

 

Get Better at Brush Pen Lettering!

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Brush lettering is an increasingly popular approach to creating beautiful words.
Last week I compared two markers for this purpose, and promised to put together a little tutorial to get you going with brush lettering. Here it is!

First of all, there are two types of brush lettering: one uses brush pens, and the other involves writing with a real brush and watercolors. The kind I will be talking about today is the first kind.
A brush pen would be the Tombow ABT Dual Brush Pen I wrote about last week, or the brush nib on a Copic marker. Although called pens, brush pens are really just markers with a long, pointed nib that resembles a paintbrush. You can create a similar look with regular, cheaper markers, however that is not considered true brush lettering.
Using a brush pen correctly takes a little work. You have to learn how to apply pressure in order to create thin and thick strokes, and how to alternate between them. There are many elaborate e-courses available for purchase online, but I taught myself by messing around for a little while with a Tombow. I believe that with a few simple guidelines on how to practice, you can learn brush pen lettering quickly.

Brush Lettering InfographicAll Markers are Not Created Equal.

Learning how to write with a brush pen is different than with a Crayola. The good thing is that you can learn with both. Go to the art store, try different markers, and pick the one that you like the best to practice with.
4/5 of the markers I demonstrated above can work. The one that cannot is the fine tip on the Tombow, because you are unable to create thin and thick strokes.

 

Familiarize Yourself with Faux Calligraphy.

Understanding how calligraphy works is an important step. You can create faux calligraphy with any kind of pen or marker (you could even use a pencil). Write a word in cursive, and then go back and find the downstrokes (the places where you moved your pen down toward you to create the letter). Thicken the downstrokes. This is the idea of calligraphy — creating thin upstrokes and thicker downstrokes. However, in calligraphy, you do it all in one swift motion.

Know Your Nib

Work on creating the thinnest and thickest possible stroke with your marker. Your grip, the angle you hold the pen, and the pressure you apply all factor in to creating your strokes.

Get Drilling

Drills are a simple way to learn how to alternate between a thin and thick stroke with your marker. I showed a variety of drills, but they all have to do with the same idea: thin upstroke, thick downstroke. Whatever drill you decide to try, the key is repetition. Keep going until the motion begins to feel natural to you.

Practice Your Letters

Creating letters involves using the thin up, thick down technique. The shape of the letter depends on your preference — you can create cursive, sans, or even serif. Repetition is always a good idea — if you don’t feel good writing a particular letter, pull out a piece of scratch paper and write it over and over again.

Create!

Once you start playing with a brush pen, you’ll just be itching to create something. Don’t be afraid to try, even if you haven’t fully mastered all the letters yet. There’s so much inspiration out there.

Hope you all found this article helpful and inspiring! If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment or visit the contact page. Happy lettering!

Lettering Marker Review: Crayola or Tombow?

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Tombow-or-Crayola-

Markers are so much fun when it comes to hand lettering. Using a few simple techniques, you can achieve a lot of different styles quickly and easily.

There are many options when it comes to which markers to use, but I’m determined to find the best one! So far, I’ve noticed that Tombow ABT Dual Brush Pens are a very popular choice. Crayola’s broad line markers have grown on me in particular.

So, Tombow or Crayola?

Tombow

Pros

  • The dual tips — one side is a brush, and the other side is a sturdy, fine point marker.
  • They BLEND! You can mix colors (see video below) for a gradient effect in your lettering. You can also blend similar colors (not as well as Copics, but it does work) if you are coloring an illustration.
  • Great, expansive color selection — you can buy a few colors individually or load up with a pack.

Cons

  • Pricy. It’s not horrible (compared to Copics), but one marker is about the same price as a full pack of Crayola! ($2)
  • Delicate tip — the brush pen tip can be easily damaged if not taken care of properly. It’s difficult to keep intact.

Crayola

Pros

  • Durable, easy to use tip. Crayola markers are traditionally designed for kids, so the broad line tip does not damage easily.
  • Cheap!
  • Looks just as good as lettering with Tombow pens.
  • Pipsqueak option: Crayola pipsqueaks are a mini version with the same tips as the regular markers.

Cons

  • Color selection is not as expansive as the Tombows, and you have to buy them in sets. The majority of sets include 10 markers, and the only way to get a large array of colors is to buy the 64 pack!
  • Ink quality is not quite as good. The colors are bright, but the markers bleed and ruin the paper if you go over one area too many times. This makes them fine for lettering, but bad for coloring.

You don’t need fancy supplies for great art. A simple pack of Crayola markers can get you great results if you know how to use them.

For inspiration of using these tools, check out @tombowusa and @crayola on Instagram.

On the blog soon: Lettering with Markers Tutorial