All New Procreate Brushes are Here

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I’m excited to introduce a brand new set of high-quality, custom-made Procreate lettering brushes as a follow-up to my first!

These brushes will be a great addition to your collection and make lettering a breeze. They are availible on Creative Market and Gumroad, and are designed for new and experienced iPad calligraphers alike!

Procreate Lettering Set 2

  1. ETHEREAL – This brush is super fun and addicting. It fades as you write, creating a cool variance in opacity.
  2. NEWSPRINT – This brush as a subtle gritty texture.
  3. OPAQUE BOLD – Create thick scripts and bold lettering designs.
  4. OPAQUE – This easy-to-use lettering brush is perfect for elegant calligraphy or funky messy lettering.

Hope to see you using these brushes and enjoying them!

Happy New Year! 🙂

 

Best Lettering Tools On a Budget

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There are so many great lettering tools, and I enjoy trying as many as I can! But art supplies can be expensive, and if you’re on a budget, that shouldn’t stop you from learning hand lettering! There are many great workarounds, as shown in this infographic.

Spend or Save? Lettering Infographic from Ray of Light Design

I hope you find these suggestions helpful.

Happy lettering! 🙂

I’m Taking Over 53’s Instagram Account!

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I have the honor of being the featured artist to take over FiftyThree’s Instagram account this weekend! I’m super excited!

If you are on Instagram, follow @fiftythree to see what I share. You can also follow me @ray.of.light.design.

Stay tuned! During the takeover, I will be giving away one Pencil by 53 and one copy of my Hand Drawn Floral Fun Pack! I will also be posting artwork made with paper, as well as some inspiring tips and tutorials.

See you there!

Brush Lettering Process Tutorial

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Here’s a quick look at an easy way to create a hand lettered piece with marker.

First of all, I suggest you take a look at the “Get Better at Brush Pen Lettering” post if you haven’t yet and learn how to use a brush pen. Once you know that, you’re ready to go!

What you’ll need:

  • At least one colored marker or brush pen
  • One black marker or brush pen
  • Two sheets of printer paper
  • A pencil

1. Create an outline with your pencil.

A lot of hand lettering artists seem like they’re doing everything freehanded, and that’s fine, but I believe that an initial sketch is important. It gives you the opportunity to think of an interesting layout. In these photos, I am using a lead holder by Staedler.

2. Complete the rough draft by tracing with your black marker.

 

Don’t worry about erasing your pencil lines, this is not the final version. Here I used a black Tombow Dual Brush Pen.

3. Place the second sheet of Paper on top of your rough draft.

You should be able to see the faint outline of your text.

4. Trace over the faint outline with your colored markers.

This is the final piece, and it’s completely free of any erasing of Pencil marks. You can add flourishes, illustrations, or more text if you like. If you mess up tracing over your rough draft, you can simply grab another piece of paper and try again (which is exactly what I did: the final one is shown below).

Here I used Sakura Koi Coloring Brushes — pink blended with orange.

Shown here are two more pieces I made using this process.

Have fun trying this out, and don’t forget to share with me what you make on social media!

Get Better at Brush Pen Lettering!

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Brush lettering is an increasingly popular approach to creating beautiful words.
Last week I compared two markers for this purpose, and promised to put together a little tutorial to get you going with brush lettering. Here it is!

First of all, there are two types of brush lettering: one uses brush pens, and the other involves writing with a real brush and watercolors. The kind I will be talking about today is the first kind.
A brush pen would be the Tombow ABT Dual Brush Pen I wrote about last week, or the brush nib on a Copic marker. Although called pens, brush pens are really just markers with a long, pointed nib that resembles a paintbrush. You can create a similar look with regular, cheaper markers, however that is not considered true brush lettering.
Using a brush pen correctly takes a little work. You have to learn how to apply pressure in order to create thin and thick strokes, and how to alternate between them. There are many elaborate e-courses available for purchase online, but I taught myself by messing around for a little while with a Tombow. I believe that with a few simple guidelines on how to practice, you can learn brush pen lettering quickly.

Brush Lettering InfographicAll Markers are Not Created Equal.

Learning how to write with a brush pen is different than with a Crayola. The good thing is that you can learn with both. Go to the art store, try different markers, and pick the one that you like the best to practice with.
4/5 of the markers I demonstrated above can work. The one that cannot is the fine tip on the Tombow, because you are unable to create thin and thick strokes.

 

Familiarize Yourself with Faux Calligraphy.

Understanding how calligraphy works is an important step. You can create faux calligraphy with any kind of pen or marker (you could even use a pencil). Write a word in cursive, and then go back and find the downstrokes (the places where you moved your pen down toward you to create the letter). Thicken the downstrokes. This is the idea of calligraphy — creating thin upstrokes and thicker downstrokes. However, in calligraphy, you do it all in one swift motion.

Know Your Nib

Work on creating the thinnest and thickest possible stroke with your marker. Your grip, the angle you hold the pen, and the pressure you apply all factor in to creating your strokes.

Get Drilling

Drills are a simple way to learn how to alternate between a thin and thick stroke with your marker. I showed a variety of drills, but they all have to do with the same idea: thin upstroke, thick downstroke. Whatever drill you decide to try, the key is repetition. Keep going until the motion begins to feel natural to you.

Practice Your Letters

Creating letters involves using the thin up, thick down technique. The shape of the letter depends on your preference — you can create cursive, sans, or even serif. Repetition is always a good idea — if you don’t feel good writing a particular letter, pull out a piece of scratch paper and write it over and over again.

Create!

Once you start playing with a brush pen, you’ll just be itching to create something. Don’t be afraid to try, even if you haven’t fully mastered all the letters yet. There’s so much inspiration out there.

Hope you all found this article helpful and inspiring! If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment or visit the contact page. Happy lettering!

Send a Holiday Card with Felt!

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fiftythree-paper-felt-cards-display-2 shot-7Felt prints handwritten cards in your own penmanship: sealed, stamped, and mailed. It’s all from your iPad or iPhone. I’m a featured artist this season, and that means I’m selling this design in their shop.

 

If you want to send a card…

  1. Get the Felt app on your iPhone or iPad
  2. Select the card you like from the Felt store.
    1. You can also upload images and customize your card.
    2. If you like my design, you can find it under the menu option “Fifty Three.”
  3.  Fill out the inside with either typing or your handwriting.
    1. You can also add up to three printed photo squares to send.
  4. Fill out the envelope with the addresses you want.
  5. Purchase your card!

Felt will print everything for you and mail it, and for the whole thing it’s the same price as buying a card at CVS.

fiftythree-paper-holiday-cards-felt-app

So, send a card to all your friends and family!

Read more here.